Posts Tagged: sports helmet

Redesigned cricket helmet for safer playing (Part 1)

Cricket is one of the most modern and original sports of all modern sports, originating somewhere from 700 to 900 years ago in the UK, with international competition starting a century ago and there have been almost no major rule changes since then.

It is unbelievable that it seems nothing strange in this most controversial contest, each international match lasting 30 hours in five days and often ending without results, with each international series consisting of five matches.

Such matches (150 hours) also usually end without clear the winner. Playing with a small, very hard ball, thrown (thrown with a straight arm), at a speed of up to 160 km/h, that illustrates the rigorous thinking involving the body’s governing body. This sports helmet for humans when shooting the line was not introduced until 30 years ago despite having a terrible traumatic history.

Like almost everything else in a sport influenced by stubborn traditionalism, the design of cricket hats goes far beyond the available technology.

With the university’s mid-2004 tests, helmets can delay batsman’s response by up to a second quarter, you think we might have seen a rethink of cricket helmet design ever since, but we don’t get see that. Inspired by those experiments, designer Ravinder Sembi re-engineered a cricket helmet to fix this fundamental problem.

The tests were conducted in 2003 and 2004 at the Northumbria University School of Psychology and Sports by Dr. Nick Neave investigating physical and mental requirements during an intense polishing exercise on eight People when wearing helmets do not have standard vents and when not wearing helmets at all.

The study revealed that wearing a helmet resulted in a noticeable drop in attention and a slower reaction time in some trials. Given that these tests are conducted in sunny England, and not in semi-tropical climates where most cricket players, such as the midday sun of Mumbai, Lahore, Brisbane and so on, the results have been could be a huge potential breakthrough in cricket accessories.

The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the British Psychological Association at the Royal University, London in April 2004 and hope some major sports companies have noticed, because we have not yet See significant changes in design from full helmet recently.