Posts Tagged: one-day cricket

Complete guide to betting in cricket sport (Part 2)

Score calculation

Running from one end of the field to the other three cylinders: 1 unit

Hit the ball out to the edge of the court: 4 cells

Hit the ball without touching the ground, flying outside the boundary line (including flying into the stands): 6 cells

Cricket style

Antagonistic Cricket

Countervailing cricket is the longest cricket type, up to five days. A cricket match was attended by two nations; if there are no two states, it will not be recorded as antagonist criket. Currently, ten countries are registered to play cricket against International Cricket Council (ICC).

ICC allows a country to participate in a cricket competition if that country reaches an acceptable level. A cricket match can last five days; If a team wins five days before, the fight ends early. If after five days, no team wins, the result is a draw.

In opposing cricket sports, each team alternately plays and serves the ball; Each team can play a maximum of two balls. The goal of the game is to gain more points than the other team, in a total of two batting sessions.

In opposition cricket, to win, a team must knock the opponent out twice (or have a team ask to lose (declaration)). If a team gains more points, but the opponent is not eliminated, but continues to serve, succeed until the end of the maximum time, then the result is a tie.

The first cricket match was held in 1877, attended by England and Australia.

Daily single cricket

One-day cricket or Limited overs cricket, is a new type of cricket, invented around the 1960s and 1970s. Cricket matches are held every day. In a single-cricket match, each team is allowed to play the ball, for a limited time, usually 50 “over” rounds. After the restricted ball stroke, double, second alternately hit the ball.