Redesigned cricket helmet for safer playing (Part 2)

Fixing these findings will not only affect cricket players but also anyone who regularly wears helmets for safety purposes, from construction workers and military personnel to sports.

Other include horse riding, motor racing, motorcycle riding, cycling or whenever a significant increase in body temperature is likely to occur.

Dr Nick Neave said that while the head only accounts for 7-10% of the total body surface, the head temperature is often higher than other body regions.

Using helmets reduces airflow on the head and this leads to speculation that people who frequently wear helmets may be more susceptible to heat-related stress and high-attention tasks. may be more affected by this.

Our research has revealed that while wearing a helmet does not have an adverse physiological effect on users, it has led to a significant decline in attention and a slower response time in a number of things. Test conditions can affect the cognitive skills needed for successful polishing performance, as well as many cricket were suspected.

Helmets recommended for cricket do not require ventilation openings to allow heat to travel from the start, although some teams use them.

Making the right and quick decision is essential for a batsman player and our research can have implications not just for cricket but also for the sports and career that require morale. other, where people must wear head protection.

However, we emphasize that safety improves when helmet wearing goes beyond the small negative effects of wearing a helmet.

The tests, conducted by Dr. Neave and colleagues Dr. Mark Moss and John Emmet, used computerized test batteries to measure temperature, hydration level and fatigue before training and after 30 minutes of intense training.

The publication of Northumbria University’s research may not have led to any significant changes in the design of on-shelf cricket helmets at sporting goods stores, but it inspired Ravinder Sembi to consider what What could have been on one of his final degree projects at Ravensbourne College.

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